Saturday, September 20, 2008

DUI Illinois, Summary Suspension, Lawyer, Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License, Chicago, Illinois DUI Attorney

The DUI criminal charge in Illinois is separate from the Statutory Summary Suspension, which is an administrative process. In Illinois, Driving under the Influence of Alcohol (DUI) or on a Suspended or Revoked license can have serious consequences.

An officer stops a vehicle at a roadside safety check or for probable cause, reasonable suspicion or unusual operation. The officer observes the driver and requests a driver's license, vehicle registration.

If the officer suspects the driver is under the influence, the driver is requested to submit to field sobriety tests.

If the officer has probable cause based on the field sobriety tests, the driver is placed under arrest for DUI and taken to the police station. The driver is requested to submit to a chemical testing of breath, urine or blood.

If a tested driver's BAC is more than .05 but less than .08 percent and no drugs are found in the system, no Statutory Summary Suspension will apply. However, the associated DUI charge will remain until appropriate action is taken by the court.

If the driver refuses or fails to complete testing, the Statutory Summary Suspension will apply. A repeat offender who refuses testing will not be eligible for a Restricted Driving Permit (RDP) during the three-year suspension. A repeat offender who takes the test and fails is not eligible for an RDP during the 12-month suspension.

If the driver's test results show a BAC of .08 percent or more, or any trace of a drug, illegal substance or intoxicating compound, the driver will be issued a law enforcement sworn report notifying the driver of a Statutory Summary Suspension.

If the driver's license is valid, a receipt is issued that will allow driving for 45 days. The offender is required to post bond and may be detained until bond is posted. The offender's vehicle may be towed, impounded or seized.

Statutory Summary Suspension, Illinois (Effective on January 1, 2009, a new Illinois law mandates car breath test device for first-offense DUIs. Provides that a first offender who receives a statutory summary suspension shall be issued a monitoring device driving permit (rather than a monitoring device driver's license), except under specified circumstances.)

A Statutory Summary Suspension is an administrative procedure providing for the automatic driver's license suspension of a driver arrested for DUI who fails chemical testing (a test showing a BAC of .08 percent or more or any amount of cannabis, controlled substance or intoxicating compound) or who refuses to submit to or fails to complete testing.

Penalty for failing chemical testing:

First offense — mandatory 3-month driver's license suspension
Second offense — mandatory 12-month suspension

Penalty for refusing to submit to chemical testing:

First offense — mandatory 6-month driver's license suspension
Second offense — mandatory 36-month suspension

A Statutory Summary Suspension in Illinois does not apply to an individual who has a BAC of less than .08. If a BAC greater than .05 and additional evidence such as an open container warrants a DUI arrest, the outcome of the court case will determine if penalties apply.

Summary suspensions in Illinois are automatic, effective on the 46th day from the notice date of the suspension. This suspension of driving privileges does not take the place of criminal penalties for a DUI conviction. An offender may request a judicial hearing to challenge the legality of an arrest; however, the request does not stop the suspension from taking effect.

If a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder receives a Statutory Summary Suspension, his/her CDL privileges will be disqualified for 12 months if a first offender and lifetime disqualification for a second offender. A Judicial Driving Permit (JDP) may be available to qualifying offenders during the suspension period.

Penalties for a DUI Conviction, Driving Under the Influence, Illinois

A first-time or second-time DUI in Illinois is typically charged as a misdemeanor, not a felony. However, a third-time DUI in Illinois or a drunk driving case where someone suffers great bodily harm will be treated as a felony.

A first DUI offender in Illinois can receive court supervision, only once, which will not be viewed as a conviction. The criminal case is dismissed after successful completion of court supervision, but can't be expunged from the public record.

First conviction (under age 21) — Class A misdemeanor with possible 0- 12 months imprisonment; loss of driving privileges for minimum 2 years; 100 hours community service; fines of up to $2,500; eligible for Restricted Driving Permit (RDP) after one year of revocation; may be required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

Underage DUI, Illinois: zero tolerance law penalties apply to drivers in Illinois under age 21 who have any trace of alcohol in their systems or who refuse to submit to chemical testing.
• First offense: 3-month driver's license suspension for a BAC greater than .00; 6-month suspension for refusal to submit to or failure to complete testing.
• Second offense: 1-year driver's license suspension for a BAC greater than .00; 2-year suspension for refusal to submit to or failure to complete testing.
• If a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder receives a zero tolerance suspension, his/her CDL privileges will be disqualifed for 12 months if a first offender and lifetime disqualification for a second offender.

Offenses Related to Underage Drinking, Illinois

Purchase or Attempted Purchase of Alcohol by a Minor

• Any person under age 21 convicted of violating the Liquor Control Act of 1934 for the illegal purchase, attempting to purchase, accepting, possession or consumption of alcohol will have his/her driving privileges suspended or revoked for 1 year.

Providing Alcohol to a Person Under 21
Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; fines of $500-$2,500.

Parental Responsibility
Applies to parents or guardians knowingly allowing underage consumption of alcoholic beverages at gatherings at a residence. Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; fines of $500-$2,500.

Illegal Transportation
Offenders may have their driving privileges suspended for 1 year for a first offense and revoked for a subsequent offense.

Hotel/Motel Responsibility
Applies to any hotel/motel employee who rents a room to a person under age 21 knowing that alcoholic beverages will be consumed there; or any person age 21 or older paying for a hotel room or facility knowing alcoholic beverages will be consumed there by individuals under age 21.
• Class A misdemeanor with 0-12 months imprisonment; fines of up to $2,500.
• Persons over age 21 paying for the hotel/motel room are held liable for any injuries or damage to persons or property caused by the underage drinker(s).

Accidents Causing Injury or Death
• Any person under age 18 who has been charged with an offense as a result of an accident in which a passenger was seriously injured or killed may be denied a driver's license or license renewal by the Secretary of State's office.

First conviction (over age 21) — Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; loss of driving privileges for minimum 1 year; 100 hours community service; fines of up to $2,500; eligible for RDP; may be required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

Second conviction — Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; fines of up to $2,500; eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief; loss of driving privileges for minimum 5 years if committed within 20 years of first conviction.

—Within five years of first conviction: Mandatory 5 days in jail or 240 hours community service (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction nor is offender eligible for probation); fines of up to $2,500; eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving.

Third conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; mandatory minimum 10 days in jail or 480 hours community service; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for minimum 10 years.

—Within five years of previous conviction: Mandatory minimum 10 days in jail or 480 hours community service (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction nor is offender eligible for probation); eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

Fourth conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; fines of up to $25,000; lifetime loss of driving privileges; not eligible for any type of driving relief.

Fifth conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 1 felony with possible 4-15 years imprisonment; fines of up to $25,000; lifetime revocation of driving privileges; not eligible for any type of driving relief.

Sixth or subsequent conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class X felony with possible 6-30 years imprisonment; fines of up to $25,000; lifetime revocation of driving privileges; not eligible for any type of driving relief.

Driving Under the Extreme Influence — BAC of .16 or greater, Illinois

First conviction — Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; loss of driving privileges for minimum 1 year (if under 21, minimum 2 years); 100 hours community service; fines of $500-$2,500; eligible for RDP; may be required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

Second conviction
— Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; loss of driving privileges for minimum 5 years if committed within 20 years of first conviction.

—Within five years of first conviction: Mandatory 7 days in jail; community service may be awarded in addition to, but not in lieu of jail time; fines between $1,250-$2,500; eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

—Within 10 years of first conviction: Mandatory 2 days in jail; fines of $1,250-$2,500; eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

Third conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; mandatory 90 days imprisonment (not eligible for community service); fines of $2,500-$25,000; loss of driving privileges for minimum 10 years; eligible for RDP after one year of revocation; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

—Within 20 years of previous conviction: Loss of driving privileges for minimum 10 years.

Fourth conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7
years imprisonment (not eligible for probation or conditional discharge);
minimum fine of $2,500.

Driving Under the Influence — Child Endangerment
(driver over age 21 transporting a child under age 16)

First conviction — Mandatory 6 months in jail and 25 days of community service in a program benefiting children; loss of driving privileges for minimum 1 year; fines of $1,000-$2,500; eligible for RDP; may be required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

—If resulting in bodily harm to a child: Class 4 felony with possible 1- 3 years imprisonment; mandatory fine of $2,500-$25,000 and 25 days of community service in a program benefiting children (imprisonment or assignment to community service not subject to suspension); not eligible for probation.

Second conviction
— Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; mandatory 6 months in jail and 140 hours community service, 40 hours of which in program benefiting children (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction); not eligible for probation; fines of $1,000-$2,500; loss of driving privileges for minimum 5 years if committed within 20 years of first conviction; eligible
for RDP; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

—Within 10 years of first conviction: Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; mandatory 1 year in jail and 25 hours community service in program benefiting children (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction); not eligible for probation; minimum fine of $2,500; eligible for RDP; required to have a BAIID installed in vehicle as part of driving relief.

—Within 10 years of first conviction and resulting in bodily harm to a child: 18 months in jail; 25 days community service in program benefiting children (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction); not eligible for probation; mandatory minimum fine of $5,000-$25,000.

Third conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; 25 days community service in program benefiting children (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/ reduction); not eligible for probation; mandatory fine of $2,500-$25,000; loss of driving privileges for minimum 10 years.

—Within 20 years of previous conviction: Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; mandatory 3 years in jail and 25 days community service in program benefiting children (imprisonment or assignment of community service not subject to suspension); not eligible for
reduced sentence; mandatory fine of $25,000.

Fourth conviction (Aggravated DUI) — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; not eligible for probation/conditional discharge; minimum fine of $25,000.

DUI while Suspended or Revoked for Previous DUI; Leaving the Scene of a Personal Injury or Fatal Crash; Reckless Homicide; or Aggravated DUI with a Death.

First conviction
— Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation.

—If suspended for previous DUI: Additional 30 consecutive days in jail, 40 days of 24-hour periodic imprisonment or 720 hours community service (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/reduction); not eligible for probation; fines of up to $2,500; may result in seizure and forfeiture of vehicle.

Second conviction
— Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; mandatory 30 days in jail or 200 hours community service; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1- year revocation.

—If suspended for previous DUI: Additional 30 consecutive days in jail, 40 days of 24-hour periodic imprisonment or 720 hours community service (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/ reduction); not eligible for probation; fines of up to $2,500; may result in seizure and forfeiture of vehicle.

Third conviction — Mandatory minimum 10 days in jail or 480 hours community service; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation.

—If suspended for previous DUI: Additional 30 consecutive days in jail, 40 days of 24-hour periodic imprisonment or 720 hours community service (terms of imprisonment or community service not subject to suspension/ reduction); not eligible for probation; may result in seizure and forfeiture of vehicle.

Fourth conviction
— Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment (not eligible for probation or conditional discharge); fines of up to $25,000; may result in seizure and forfeiture of vehicle.

Additional Consequences of DUI, Illinois

• A DUI conviction is a permanent part of an offender's driving record.
• The offender may lose work time.
• The offender will be required to complete an alcohol/drug evaluation and an alcohol/drug remedial education course or substance abuse treatment program before his/her driving privileges are reinstated.
• The offender must meet the requirements of the Secretary of State's Department of Administrative Hearings prior to obtaining a Restricted Driving Permit.
• The offender's vehicle may be impounded or seized.
• A Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) may be installed in the offender's vehicle as a condition of driving relief.
• The offender is required to carry high-risk auto insurance for 36 consecutive months.
• The offender's vehicle registration will be suspended or revoked.

Penalties for Other DUI-Related Offenses, Illinois

Aggravated DUI
A third or subsequent DUI conviction; a DUI while driving a school bus carrying children; a DUI resulting in great bodily harm, permanent disability or disfigurement; a DUI without a license or permit; a DUI with no proof of insurance; or a DUI after a prior conviction of reckless homicide or Aggravated DUI resulting in one or more details.

Aggravated DUI Involving a Death
A DUI resulting in one or more deaths.
• Class 2 felony with possible 3-14 years imprisonment; fines of up to $25,000.
• Possible 6-28 years imprisonment for multiple fatalities.
• Minimum 2-year revocation of driving privileges.

Reckless Homicide (DUI)
A DUI resulting in the loss of life.
• Class 2 felony with possible 3-14 years imprisonment; fines of up to $25,000.
• Possible 6-28 years imprisonment for multiple fatalities.
• Minimum 2-year revocation of driving privileges.

Possession of Drugs in a Vehicle
Illegal possession of a controlled substance or cannabis by a driver; violations must be entered in court records and reported to the Secretary of State.
• 1-year suspension of driving privileges for a first conviction.
• 5-year suspension of driving privileges for a second conviction within 5 years.

Knowingly Permitting a Driver Under the Influence to Operate a Vehicle
Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment and fines of up to $2,500.

Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License, Illinois

First conviction —
Class A misdemeanor with possible 0-12 months imprisonment; mandatory 10-day imprisonment or 30 days community service; fines of up to $2,500; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

Second conviction — Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; minimum 30 days in jail or 300 hours community service; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

Third conviction — Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; minimum 30 days in jail or 300 hours community service; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

Fourth-ninth conviction — Class 4 felony with possible 1-3 years imprisonment; minimum 180 days in jail; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

10th-14th conviction — Class 3 felony with possible 2-5 years imprisonment; not eligible for probation or conditional discharge; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

15th or subsequent conviction — Class 2 felony with possible 3-7 years imprisonment; not eligible for probation or conditional discharge; fines of up to $25,000; loss of driving privileges for double the original suspension period or additional 1-year revocation; may result in seizure or forfeiture of vehicle.

Dram Shop
An employee or owner of an establishment may be held liable for a crash resulting from the unlawful selling, giving or delivery of alcohol in that establishment to a minor, intoxicated person or person known to be under legal disability or in need of mental treatment.
• Liability is limited to $50,467 for property damage or personal injury.
• Liability extends to $61,682 for a loss of means of support due to death or injury

Illegal Transportation/Open Container
Transporting, carrying, possessing or having any alcoholic beverages in the passenger compartment of a motor vehicle, except in the original container with the seal unbroken, is illegal. Exceptions to the law are limousines, motor homes, mini motor homes and chartered buses not hired for school purposes.
• Maximum $1,000 fine and point-assigned violation on driver's record.
• 1-year driver's license suspension or revocation for a second conviction within 12 months.
• Mandatory 1-year license suspension for an offender under age 21 for a first offense, and mandatory license revocation for a second offense.

Fraudulent IDs and Driver's Licenses
It is illegal to assist in obtaining or to fraudulently obtain, distribute, use or possess a fictitious or fraudulent state ID card or driver's license.The Secretary of State has the authority to suspend (up to 12 months) or revoke driving privileges prior to a conviction for anyone involved in the following offenses:

Class A misdemeanors (subsequent offenses are Class 4 felonies)
• Possessing, attempting to obtain or assisting another in obtaining a fictitious driver's license or permit.
• Allowing another person to use your license or permit.
• Displaying or representing as one's own any license or permit issued to someone else.
• Allowing any unlawful use of one's license or permit.

Class 4 felonies (subsequent offenses may be Class 3 felonies)
• Possessing, attempting to obtain or assisting another in obtaining a fraudulent license or permit.
• Issuing or assisting in the issuance of a fictitious driver's license.
• Manufacturing, possessing or providing any document for the purpose of obtaining a fictitious license.
• Possessing a driver's license-making or permit-making implement.

Judicial Hearings, Illinois

A driver may request a judicial hearing to challenge a summary suspension within 90 days after the notice date. The hearing must be conducted within 30 days of the request or on the first court date scheduled to consider the criminal charges.

Legally, only four issues may be considered:
• Whether the person was properly arrested;
• Whether there were reasonable grounds to believe at the time of arrest that the person was driving or in physical control of the vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs;
• Whether the driver, after being informed of the impending summary suspension, refused to submit to chemical testing; and
• Whether, after being advised of the summary suspension, the driver submitted to chemical testing that showed a BAC of .08 or greater or any trace of cannabis, a controlled substance and/or intoxicating compounds.

The summary suspension is rescinded if the court rules in favor of the driver. The result of the hearing is entered on the driver's record.

Driving Permits, Illinois

Drivers who have had their licenses suspended or revoked may be granted limited driving privileges. These temporary driving permits are only issued for employment, education and/or medical purposes when no other form of transportation is available. Some offenders may be required to have a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) installed in their vehicles as a condition for the issuance of a permit.

Judicial Driving Permit (JDP), Illinois

• Drivers under age 18 are not eligible for a JDP.
• First-time DUI offenders may request a JDP from the court to allow limited driving during a Statutory Summary Suspension. (A first-time offender is a driver who has not received a previous summary suspension, been convicted of DUI or assigned court supervision for DUI in this state, or who has not been convicted of DUI in another state within five years.)

Before the court can approve a permit, the offender must prove a hardship exists and provide proof of a current professional alcohol and drug evaluation.
• The JDP does not become effective until the 31st day of suspension.
• A commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder does not qualify for a JDP to operate a commercial motor vehicle. The driver may be eligible for a JDP for base driving privileges if the driver is a first offender.

Restricted Driving Permit (RDP), Illinois

Full driving privileges are lost for a minimum of five years if a driver receives a second conviction for any of the following: DUI; leaving the scene of a personal injury or fatal crash; reckless homicide, or any combination of these offenses in a 20-year period. If a driver receives a third conviction for any of these offenses, regardless of the length of time between convictions, full driving privileges will be lost for a minimum 10 years. If a driver receives a fourth or subsequent conviction, his/her license will be revoked permanently. If a driver is convicted of DUI in another state, Illinois driving privileges will be revoked.

If eligible, those convicted of DUI may apply to the Secretary of State's office for an RDP.
• A multiple offender whose BAC test results are .08 percent or greater or whose chemical test indicates any amount of a controlled substance, is not eligible for an RDP during the summary suspension period.
• A multiple offender who refuses to submit to or fails to complete chemical testing is not eligible for an RDP during the summary suspension.
• A driver under age 16 whose driving privileges are revoked is not eligible for an RDP.
• To obtain an RDP, the offender must prove hardship exists, provide a current professional drug and alcohol evaluation and, when appropriate, provide proof of remedial education or treatment.
• An offender must appear before a hearing officer in the Secretary of State's Department of Administrative Hearings. The driving record is reviewed to ensure that the driver would not threaten public safety if allowed to drive on a limited basis.
• An individual with two or more alcohol related driving incidents on his/her driving record within 10 years is required to have a Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) installed in his or her vehicle for the duration of the RDP. As required by statute, the individual is responsible for the fee required for the BAIID during this period.
• An individual requesting a formal hearing for an RDP or reinstatement of his or her driving privileges will be charged a $50 nonrefundable filing fee when requesting the formal hearing.

Driver’s License Reinstatement, Illinois, Chicago

Statutory Summary Suspension, Illinois
Driving privileges may be reinstated at the end of the Statutory Summary Suspension period unless the court instructs the Secretary of State otherwise.

A person convicted of DUI who lost his/her driving privileges because of a summary suspension will have that time credited to the minimum driver's license revocation period.

Before driving privileges can be reinstated:
• Other suspensions or revocations on the driving record must be cleared.
• A $250 reinstatement fee must be paid to the Secretary of State, $30 of which goes to the Department of Human Services, Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, to help defray the cost of professional alcohol and drug evaluations for indigent offenders.
• In the case of repeat offenders, the reinstatement fee is $500, with $60 going to the Illinois Road Fund, $190 going to the Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Fund, and $250 going to the General Revenue Fund.
• The reinstatement of a Statutory Summary Suspension becomes valid when it is entered on the driver's record in the Secretary of State's office provided the provisional termination date has passed.
• Payment for the reinstatement fee may be mailed to: Secretary of State, DUI Section, 2701 S. Dirksen Pkwy., Springfield, IL 62723. If paying by credit card, please call 217-782-3619 (debit cards not accepted).

Revocation

To have driving privileges reinstated in Illinois, a driver convicted of DUI must:
• Have a clear driving record other than the revocation sanction.
• Undergo an alcohol and drug evaluation. If an alcohol or drug problem is indicated, proof of treatment must be submitted.
• Complete an alcohol and drug remedial education program. Even if the evaluation does not recommend treatment, the driver is still required to complete a remedial education program.
• Appear before a Secretary of State hearing officer. For a first offense, aninformal hearing may be conducted by visiting a hearing officer at one of the regional Driver Services facilities. Multiple offenders must request in writing, pay a $50 non-refundable filing fee and attend a formal hearing in Chicago, Springfield, Mt. Vernon or Joliet.
• Demonstrate during the hearing that public safety will not be endangered if driving privileges are restored. The hearing officer considers the seriousness of the offense, the offender's overall driving record and the driver's remedial efforts.
• File proof of financial responsibility prior to reinstatement, pay a $500 reinstatement
fee, pass the driver's license examination (written, vision and driving portions) and pay the appropriate application fee.
• Repeat offenders must pay an additional $500 in reinstatement fees.
• Payment for a revocation may be mailed to: Secretary of State, Traffic Violations Section, 2701 S. Dirksen Pkwy., Springfield, IL 62723. If paying by credit card, please call 217-785-8619 (debit cards not accepted).
• An individual requesting a formal hearing for reinstatement of his/her driving privileges must pay a $50 non-refundable filing fee when requesting the formal hearing.

A reinstatement in Illinois becomes valid when it is entered on the driver's record in the Secretary of State's office.

Secretary of State
Administrative Hearings Dept.
291 Howlett Bldg.
Springfield, IL 62756
217-782-7065
or
17 N. State St., #1200
Chicago, IL 60602
312-793-3862


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